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Our air is unbreathable; our rivers are dying and climate change is still considered a subject of debate instead of the reality that it is. It is time to remember how intimately connected we are with the environment and Nature. And realise that if we want a shift in our collective consciousness on climate change, then we need to look inward as part of the journey to look outward into a world, that we must learn to love and protect with the individual choices we make

Bandana Tewari

When a 16-year-old climate campaigner—Greta Thunberg—has to stand before seasoned politicians in the US (and the world), telling them “This Is The Time To Wake Up”, calling out a nation, the largest emitter of greenhouse gases for their inaction - you know that we live in a world of ecological ignorance and environmental neglect.

At times like this, we need to take individual action, and personal responsibility to re-evaluate what ‘earth consciousness’ means to each one of us on a personal level. If we want a shift in our collective consciousness on climate change, then we need to look inward as part of the journey to look outward into a world, that we must learn to love and protect with the individual choices we make.

In Sanskrit, there is a maxim — Aha Brahmāsmi — which means “I am the ultimate energy”, a powerful affirmation of the cosmic continuity and unity between macrocosm and microcosm, the Brahma and Atma. It is a deep belief in our interconnectedness to everything that makes up the universe. As astrophysicist supremo—Neil deGrasse Tyson poetically put it: “The atoms of our bodies are traceable to stars that manufactured them in their cores and exploded these enriched ingredients across our galaxy, billions of years ago. For this reason, we are biologically connected to every other living thing in the world. We are chemically connected to all molecules on Earth. And we are atomically connected to all atoms in the universe. We are not figuratively, but literally stardust.”

Atomically connected—this is powerful. This is what we need to internalize and believe from the depths of our hearts. The earliest mention of atomic theory is in the thousands of years old Vedic texts from India. Through deep meditation, the seers (or scientists of that time) realized that atoms or Anu, the Sanskrit name, played a central role in spirituality and the interconnectedness of our corporeal bodies to the cosmic drama; and that was the genesis of profound spiritual symbols like Aumkara and Swastika (not the one vilified by the Nazis).

One profound belief can lead to a collective consciousness that honours the Absolute Sacredness of creation. And that sacredness is about respect for the world we inhabit together, not alone. Apariraha, one of the eleven vows that Mahatma Gandhi took, means that we are mere trustees and custodians of the environment, not owners. So, we, collectively, owe it to the next generations to pass the environment in a healthy and revered condition.

In Sanskrit there is one phrase that poignantly encapsulates a social philosophy that all of humanity is made of one life energy: Vasudhaiva Kutumbakam: the whole world is one family. Vasudhaiva Kutumbakam - the first word is made up of three Sanskrit words - Vasudha, Eva and Kutumbakam. Vasudha means the earth, Eva means emphasizing and Kutumbakam means a family. The idea of family (not necessarily blood family) is entrenched in the ideals of compassion and inter-dependence that finds its source in the futility of isolation.

It is said “If the whole ocean is one how then a drop of the ocean be different from the ocean? If the drop is different from the ocean how then can it ultimately be dissolved in the ocean?” This is the philosophy of life.

Now shouldn’t this be our personal philosophy of kindness and compassion for the world we live in? Should this not be our spiritual connection with earth consciousness? One profound belief can lead to a collective consciousness that honours the Absolute Sacredness of creation.

And that sacredness is about respect for the world we inhabit together, not alone.

Apariraha, one of the eleven vows that Mahatma Gandhi took, means that we are mere trustees and custodians of the environment, not owners. So, we, collectively, owe it to the next generations to pass the environment in a healthy and revered condition. Children should not be fighting to live harmoniously in a world that we have enjoyed for ourselves. Let us truly believe in the divine source of our being and open our arms (policies—political and persona) to heal the world.

Be Universal in your Love.
You will see the Universe as picture of your own Being.

Sri Chinmoy

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Beautifully summarised philosophy of what should be at a deeper level understood by all humanity………… really not that difficult to understand that all the suffering to us is caused by self!